POP ART A REVOLUTIONARY ART MOVEMENT IN THE 1960’S WHICH HIGHLIGHTED THE IMPORTANCE OF THE MASS MEDIA [CINEMA , TELEVISION POPULAR MAGAZINES AND COMICS]. AN APPRECIATION OF TWO AMERICANPOP ARTISTS WHO WERE PART OF THIS TRADITION : ANDY WARHOL(1930-1987) AND ROY LICHENSTEIN (1923-1997) PART 4.

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This is my final and concluding part to my retrospective on Pop Art. Continuing with the comments of David McCarty. “Indeed it seemed that the American dream was no longer defined by political freedom but instead was measured by the number of commodities citizens could acquire”. [1].

McCarthy shows that Pop art was truly the art of the masses and it could traverse class barriers and be appreciated by anyone never mind what their income status was.

“The things represented within the paintings were available for people of most classes while the paintings themselves which proved to be highly marketable as art commodities especially when produced as prints, posters and postcards”. [2].

” Roy Lichenstein mimicked the look of cheap mass-produced images through the use of Benday dots”. [3]. What Lichenstein was doing was copying the art of Georges Seurat and his use of Pointillism . The similarities are quite obvious.

Pointing to Warhol’s great ability was his recognition of using the mass media to achieve recognisable fame. ” Perhaps more than any other pop artist Warhol understood the necessity of easily recognisable and endlessly repeatable images for establishing fame through the mass media”. [4].

” several pop artists examined the academic  subjects of History, portraiture , landscape and still life as well as the utterly traditional subject of the reclining nude”. [5].

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As McCarthy suggests many pop artists including Ramos and Warhol used or copied images from other art periods.Lichenstein would often in his later work use images from Cubism and the art of the Destyll movement of Mondrian and Van Doesburg.

” Mel Ramos and Roy Lichenstein made their fully pop statement by using heroic male characters from the comics first introduced in the decade before the War”. [6].

” Although pop imagery was frequently mass produced and therefore widely available it was subject to highly personal consumption and interpretation “. [7].

Warhol’s disaster pictures particularly of car crashes ,Race riots and the Electric Chair resonated with a number of people and are seen by Warhol as a critique of that culture. ” Not simply commodities resold as works of art Warhol’s silkscreens are also bitter condemnation of a culture of abundance and violence of hedonism and death”. [8].

” Here was an art  understandable on the surface yet deeply resonant to those viewers  willing to contemplate the images and contexts selected by the artist”. [9].

Showing its critique of the past particularly Greenbergian Modernism McCarthy offers the following comment .” Pop proposed a new art open to the many. In doing so it helped relegate a narrow definition of Modernism (Greenberg and Fried) to the past by proposing that the present needed something more”. [10].

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Jamie Jones in his review of Pop artists shows how Pop art would use any form of written materials  in the media to satirise.

” Thus commercial products , advertising newspaper clippings even comic books and pornography are fair game for the pop artist”. [11]

” For the first time icons from popular culture seemed to have gained a power in society that rivalled that of politicians and businessmen “. [12].

Jones shows how pop art rejected  completely the notion of artistic style. ” For pop not only rejected the subject matter of traditional art it scorned its ethos. what distinguished Pop art from previous schools of painting was its rejection  of the very notion of an artistic style”. [13].

” The Pop artists were born in an era when American pop culture epitomised by the fabulous success  of Hollywood was enjoying a complete global triumph”. [14].

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Jones shows how in 1963 Warhol turned to the medium which was important to him Film. ” In 1963 he (Warhol) turned to the medium which more than any others traffics in Fame Film”. [15].

Jones depicts the Film Actor who personifies Warhol’s activity in Filmaking Joe Dallesandro .

Commenting on Lichenstein Jones has this to say . ” Lichenstein who was a real artist in the sense that he was being exhibited in Art Galleries deliberately gave his paintings the appearance of having been reproduced”. [16].

” Lichenstein was even more subversive  transferring to his paintings found texts  (Whaam) that had been lucked from the middle of a story unknown to the viewer. Yet it might be worth recalling that this is a device of epic poetry known as in Medics RE:”. [17].

This then completes my series on Pop Art . For my next postings I will be discussing 14th and 15th Century art by looking at two artists who I admire Jan Van Eyck the great Burgundian Artist and Caravaggio the great and notorious 15th century artist.

FOOTNOTES

1) POP ART [MOVEMENTS IN MODERN ART] DAVID McCARTHY PG. 28

2) DITTO PG.31

3) DITTO PG.33

4) DITTO PG.41

5) DITTO PG.58

6) DITTO PG. 63

7)  DITTO PG. 64

8)  DITTO PG. 68

9)  DITTO PG. 75-6

10) DITTO PG. 76

11) POP ART PHAIDON JAMIE JONES PG. 5

12) DITTO PG. 6

13)  DITTO PG.11

14)  DITTO PG. 13

15)   DITTO PG. 16

16)   DITTO PG. 70

17)   DITTO PG. 78.

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3 thoughts on “POP ART A REVOLUTIONARY ART MOVEMENT IN THE 1960’S WHICH HIGHLIGHTED THE IMPORTANCE OF THE MASS MEDIA [CINEMA , TELEVISION POPULAR MAGAZINES AND COMICS]. AN APPRECIATION OF TWO AMERICANPOP ARTISTS WHO WERE PART OF THIS TRADITION : ANDY WARHOL(1930-1987) AND ROY LICHENSTEIN (1923-1997) PART 4.”

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